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May 25, 2018

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1/9 Pushed to the Edge

January 10, 2018

I thought it was a normal day.  I arrived at school at 8:30, made my lesson plans for grade five math and Christian studies and grade 7 Christian studies.  While on the week end safari I collected left over food to give the kids.  They were all so desperate to get a little food.  I asked some of my students individually why this was.  The kids all said that they were all hungry and barely were fed at home.  At school they get one cup of porridge a day. 

 

 

 

 (my classes hard at work)

 

 

 

 (These kids always insist on selfies)

 

 (Teacher Kelly!)

 

 

But my day quickly changed.  After teaching I go to a different pre-school to play with the kids.  Today I was dropping off donations.  After leaving the classroom and getting ready to leave the compound, I saw a boy face down in the dirt.  I thought he fell.  Then he started convulsing, it was a seizure.  Immediately I yelled for Karl another volunteer.  He lifted the boy up and got him into a classroom.  I put my bag under his head and remembered from Greys Anatomy to turn him on his side, keep his chin up, and keep him awake.  When he stopped seizing we tried to talk to him but he could not speak.  What made me mad were the TEACHERS THAT JUST WATCHED!  What would have happened if we weren't there?  We found out his name is Willie.  We decided to take him to an emergency clinic 20 minutes away.  We walked for what felt like forever.  We took turns carrying him.  When we finally got to the clinic he screamed to "come back".  Turns out he had a 103 degree fever!  That is bad for an adult, let alone a little four year old.  I had to hold him still while the nurse drew blood.  Little boys are powerful when avoiding needles.  It was a strand of malaria that caused the seizures.  This is a death sentence for kids in the slum.  They are malnourished and too poor to afford proper food and no way they can afford medical attention or treatment for malaria.  After Willie calmed down I fed him cashews and made sure he drank all of my water.  I rubbed his back and sang to him, that is when this photo was taken. 

 

Instead of asking for donations like I do at the end of my blog; please pray for Willie and the kids in the slum of Kibera.  Thank you and God Bless Kenya.

 

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